IFD series




Description:

Equipment constantly measures the parts of air that are protected by Cirrus IFD series. The protected area is divided into two individual "zones" for timely notification. Cirrus IFD is configured as a single-zone, dual-zone, or trozonski četvorozonski system. The air in each zone is monitored for 15 seconds, every second part of the air is passed in the "cloud chamber" and measures combustion products. If you exceed the measured part of the preset alarm zone to more than eight seconds, the alarm indicator for the zone and alarm level will be illuminated on the IFD Cirrus control panel.

Four stages of a fire

The zero phase


Real initial phase - in this phase the optical visible parts the size of 0.002 microns, which are the products of the thermal break (burning).

The first phase

Photoelectric visible parts of smoke are produced in the second phase, which may be in hours or days after the first phase of the fire.

The second phase

Visible smoke, is the stage when the fire begins to take off in larger areas. 0.0025 micron particles continue to create.

The third phase

Larger fire is visible, which may cause large amounts of smoke, depending on the material that is burning. 0.0025 micron particles continue to create.

The fourth stage

The intense heat caused by the fire and burning materials. 0.0025 micron particles are still constantly evolving.

PLEASE NOTE THAT THE PARTICLES GRAIN SIZE OF 0.002 MICRONS, CONTINUE TO CREATE, CIRRUS IFD WORKS THROUGH ALL OF THE PHASES OF FIRE


Technical characteristics:

  • 4 zones
  • Minimum 2 heads per zone
  • "Cloud chamber" detection
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